Okt 082012
 

This summer, many government officials and private investors finally seemed to realize that the crisis in the euro zone was not some passing aberration, but rather a result of deep-­seated political, economic, and financial problems that will take many years to resolve. The on-again, off-again euro turmoil has already proved immensely damaging to nearly all Europeans, and its negative impact is now being felt around the world. Most likely there is worse to come—and soon.

But the economic disasters of our time—which involve big banks in rich countries, call into question the viability of government debt, and seriously threaten the reach of even the most self-confident nations—will not end with the euro debacle. The euro zone is well down the path to severe crisis, but other industrialized democracies are hot on its heels. Do not let the euro zone’s troubles distract you from the bigger picture: we are all in a mess.

Who could be next in line for a gut-wrenching loss of confidence in its growth prospects, its sovereign debt, and its banking system? Think about Japan.

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KOMMENTAR The Next Panic är titeln på The Atlantic excellenta genomgång av skuldkrisen och lärdomar av Japan – och inte minst ger den ny välbehövlig kunskap och nyttiga perspektiv. Tyvärr är inte paniken ”Next” utan den har varit här länge – paniken över att inte hinna läsa alla initierade artiklar i internationella kvalitetsmagasin som The Atlantic.

Vi hinner tyvärr inte med allt det vi vill, men vi gör vårt bästa med att läsa, citera, länka och kommentera och kompletterar det med egna analyser, kolumner och reportage. Paniken att inte räcka till flåsar oss i nacken.

Börja med att läsa det gedigna reportaget ovan, så återkommer vi imorgon med kommentar.